TUSM Celebrates Scientific Achievements of Massachusetts Youth

Anatomical models

BOSTON (August 3, 2012) — Tufts University School of Medicine today celebrated the achievements of the 33 Massachusetts high school students who participated in the School’s 2012 Teachers and High School Student Program.  The program is one of Tufts’ signature initiatives to encourage high school students with diverse backgrounds to explore their interest in medicine and biomedical sciences. Established in 1989, the Tufts program supports the careers of aspiring young doctors and scientists by engaging them in a range of clinical and research opportunities across the Tufts Health Sciences campus in Boston. 

“Tufts University is committed to nurturing scientific curiosity among young people of diverse backgrounds, particularly those from communities that are underrepresented in medicine and the health sciences,” said Harris Berman, M.D., dean of Tufts University School of Medicine.  “The extraordinary students who participated in our high school program this summer have contributed immeasurably to the Tufts community, and we are proud to offer high school students the opportunity to launch promising careers as health professionals.”   

“Our summer program for high school students offers invaluable experience to young people who might not otherwise have opportunities to explore their budding interests in medicine and the biomedical sciences,” said Joyce Sackey, M.D., dean for multicultural affairs and global health and associate professor at Tufts University School of Medicine.  “Tufts’ Teachers and High School Students Program is one of our key initiatives to support the educational development of youth in our community.”

Selected high school students participated in a seven-week program and spent up to 25 hours each week in various positions at Tufts University School of Medicine, Tufts University School of Dental Medicine, Sackler Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences at Tufts or Tufts Medical Center.  Students also took a gross anatomy course taught by Tufts medical students and gained knowledge of laboratory-based science; in the process, students developed relationships with medical and graduate student mentors that Tufts expects will continue beyond the summer program.

The Tufts program also includes an independent study, the findings of which the students presented to the Tufts community, family and friends today.  Participating students were:

Edward Akubude (Mattapan), 16, Concord-Carlisle Regional High School

“Reduction of OCD Symptoms in Mice”

Carlos Angeles (Norton), 19, Xaverian Brothers High School

“The Relationship Between Diabetes and Diet”

Christina Augustin (Medford), 16, Prospect Hill Academy Charter School

“The Effects of Marijuana on Pregnancy”

Janika Beatty (Malden), 17, Community Charter School of Cambridge

“The Effects of Marijuana on Pregnancy”

Carrington Cazeau (Boston), 16, Natick High School

“Zebrafish Fin Mutations”

Walter Chacon (Lynn), 16, Phillips Academy Andover

“The Relationship Between Obesity and Depression”

Malka Forman (Brighton), 17, Maimonides School

“Lower Limb Ischemic Threshold with Near Infrared Spectrometry Device”

John Frazer (Quincy), 16, Boston College High School

“Evidence Based Review of Domestic Violence” (The reporting and recognition by healthcare providers of child abuse and neglect in the Latino population)”

Ericka Garcia (Brookline) 15, Brookline High School

“Leukemia in Children”

Bryant Gill (Foxboro), 17, Xaverian Brothers High School

“Correlation of Neuronal Signal to Astrocyte Morphology”

Nathan Gill (Foxboro), 16, Xaverian Brothers High School

“Reduction of OCD symptoms in Mice”

Yvonne Hamisi (Springfield), 18, Baystate-Springfield Educational Partnership

“Cardiac Differences Between Athletes and Non-Athletes”

Elyane James (Dorchester), 18, Marblehead High School

“Evidence Based Review of Domestic Violence” (The reporting and recognition by healthcare providers of child abuse and neglect in the Latino population)”

Hyunji Koo (North Andover), 16, Phillips Academy Andover

“Cross-cultural Communication and the Doctor-Patient Relationship”

Fatima Khan (Somerville), 16, Prospect Hill Academy Charter School

“Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms”

Ryan Kuehl (Springfield), 18, Baystate-Springfield Educational Partnership

“Too Much Exercise?”

Anthony “Nino” Lambert (Hanover), 16, Boston College High School

“Factors That Affect the Concentration of Serine”

Jessica Mar (Brighton), 16, Boston Latin School

“Physician Wellness”

Abby Mendez (Roxbury), 17, City on a Hill

“Evidence Based Review of Domestic Violence (The reporting and recognition by healthcare providers of child abuse and neglect in the Latino population)”

Jasmine Ngan (Somerville), 16, Prospect Hill Academy Charter School

The Effects of Storage Conditions on Bloodspot Amino Acids”

Blessing Ojini (Roxbury), 16, Needham High School

“The Benefits of Play in Child Development”

Emanuel Parrilla (Springfield), 18, Baystate-Springfield Educational Partnership

“The Effects of a Torn ACL in Later Life”

Klarissa Ramkissoon (Milton), 17, Milton High School

“Behavioral Testing in Mice”

Krystina San Soucie (Upton), 16, Nipmuc Regional High School

“Methods to Maximize Serine Levels”

Abdullahi Tahlil (Roxbury), 17, Match High School

“Child Health Assessment Mapping Project”

Lisa Tam (Boston), 18,   John D. O'Bryant High School of Math and Science

“Effectiveness of Home Visits Compared with Standard Care”

Dorothy Tran (Boston), 17, The Winsor School

“Child Health Assessment Mapping Project”

Arianna Unger (Newton), 17, Maimonides School

“A Comparative Study of Two Orthotic Systems Used for the Assisted Ambulation of a Child with Spina Bifida”

Camille Van Allen (Milton), 17, Milton High School

“Benefits of Breast Feeding”

Winnie Wang (Boston), 18, Boston Latin School

“Relationship Between Toxic/Nutritional and Leber's Hereditary Optic Neuropathy”

Natalie Wolanski (Springfield), 17, Baystate-Springfield Educational Partnership

“Concussions in Sports and Society”

Davonte Willis (Quincy), 18, Quincy High School

“Factors That Affect the Concentration of Amine Acids”

Kavin Zhu (Boston), 17, Boston Latin School

“Genetic Disease as Exemplified by Hunter Syndrome”

The Teachers and High School Students Program is one of a number of “pipeline” programs at Tufts University School of Medicine designed to engage diverse students interested in the fields of medicine and biomedical sciences.  Tufts offers programs for diverse students in middle school, high school, and college, as well as college graduates.

About Tufts University School of Medicine and the Sackler School of Graduate Biomedical Sciences

Tufts University School of Medicine and the Sackler School of Graduate Biomedical Sciences at Tufts University are international leaders in innovative medical education and advanced research. The School of Medicine and the Sackler School are renowned for excellence in education in general medicine, biomedical sciences, special combined degree programs in business, health management, public health, bioengineering and international relations, as well as basic and clinical research at the cellular and molecular level. Ranked among the top in the nation, the School of Medicine is affiliated with six major teaching hospitals and more than 30 health care facilities. Tufts University School of Medicine and the Sackler School undertake research that is consistently rated among the highest in the nation for its effect on the advancement of medical science.

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If you are a member of the media interested in learning more about this topic, or speaking with a faculty member at Tufts University, please contact Jennifer Kritz at 617-636-3707 or Siobhan Gallagher at (617) 636-6586.