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Tufts University School of Medicine

Carol Kumamoto

Professor of Molecular Biology & Microbiology
Department: Molecular Biology and Microbiology
Programs: Biomedical Sciences, Genetics, Molecular Microbiology
Laboratory: Jaharis 425

Carol Kumamoto

Professor of Molecular Biology & Microbiology
Department: Molecular Biology and Microbiology
Programs: Biomedical Sciences, Genetics, Molecular Microbiology
Laboratory: Jaharis 425

Phone 617-636-0404
Lab phone: 617-636-6803
Office: Jaharis 429
Campus: Boston

Links

Biography

Candida albicans, an opportunistic fungal pathogen, causes diseases ranging from mild, superficial infection to life-threatening disseminated disease. Immunocompromised patients such as cancer patients and transplant recipients are at risk for disseminated candidiasis, a disease that is difficult to diagnose and is associated with high mortality. Growth of C. albicans in filamentous forms is associated with tissue invasion and is important for pathogenicity. Our research is directed towards understanding the environmental cues that stimulate filamentous growth and the genes involved in filamentous and invasive growth. We also investigate host-Candida interactions during intestinal colonization.

Education

  • AB, Biology, University of California, Los Angeles
  • PhD, Molecular Biology, University of California, Los Angeles
  • Postdoctoral Training, Harvard Medical School; Stanford University

Research synopsis

Candida albicans, an opportunistic fungal pathogen, causes diseases ranging from mild, superficial infection to life-threatening disseminated disease. Immunocompromised patients such as cancer patients and transplant recipients are at risk for disseminated candidiasis, a disease that is difficult to diagnose and is associated with high mortality. Growth of C. albicans in filamentous forms is associated with tissue invasion and is important for pathogenicity. Our research is directed towards understanding the environmental cues that stimulate filamentous growth and the genes involved in filamentous and invasive growth. We also investigate host-Candida interactions during intestinal colonization.

Publications

Regan H, Scaduto C, Hirakawa MP, Gunsalus K, Correia-Mesquita TO, Sun Y, Chen Y, Kumamoto CA, Bennett R, Whiteway M. 2017. Negative regulation of filamentous growth in Candida albicans by Dig1p. Mol Microbiol. Epub ahead of print.

Herwald SE, Zucchi PC, Tan S, Kumamoto CA. 2017. The two transmembrane regions of Candida albicans Dfi1 contribute to its biogenesis. Biochem Biophys Res Commun. 488: 153-158.

Green ER, Clark S, Crimmins GT, Mack M, Kumamoto CA, Mecsas J. 2016. Fis is essential for Yersinia pseudotuberculosis virulence and protects against reactive oxygen species produced by phagocytic cells during infection. PLoS Pathog. 12: e1005898.

Kumamoto CA. 2016. The fungal mycobiota: Small numbers, large impacts. Cell Host Microbe 19: 750-751.

Tyc KM, Herwald SE, Hogan JA, Pierce JV, Klipp E, Kumamoto CA. 2016. The game theory of Candida albicans colonization dynamics reveals host status-responsive gene expression. BMC Syst Biol. 10: 20.

Gunsalus KT, Kumamoto CA. 2016. Transcriptional profiling of Candida albicans in the host. Methods Mol Biol. 1356:17-29.