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Tufts University School of Medicine

Jyotsna Jagai

Adjunct Assistant Professor of Public Health and Community Medicine
Environmental Health Scientist (Post-Doctoral Fellow), U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
Department: Public Health & Community Medicine

Jyotsna Jagai

Adjunct Assistant Professor of Public Health and Community Medicine
Environmental Health Scientist (Post-Doctoral Fellow), U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
Department: Public Health & Community Medicine

Phone 919-966-6209
Campus: Boston

Research synopsis

I completed my PhD at Tufts University focusing on environmental epidemiology and received the interdisciplinary Water: Systems, Science and Society certificate. My research focus is on the impacts of environmental stressors, such as climate change, changes in land use and infrastructure, on water quality and human health. My dissertation research explored the seasonal patterns of waterborne diseases and environmental drivers, focusing on meteorological parameters, hydrological parameters, and livestock density at various spatial levels. This work led to the development of novel methodology to conduct a time-series meta-analysis to evaluate relationships between waterborne disease outcomes and meteorological characteristics.  I am currently a Postdoctoral Fellow at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and have expanded my research interests to consider overall environmental quality, including chemicals, pathogens, and the built environment. We are working to develop an Environmental Quality Index on the county level for the entire United States. I am also leading a research project to assess whether the association between rainfall and emergency room visits for gastrointestinal diseases varies in areas with and without combined sewer systems.

Publications

  1. Jagai JS, Sarkar R, Castronovo D, Kattula D, McEntee J, Ward H, Kang G, Naumova EN.  Seasonality of rotavirus in South Asia: a meta-analysis approach assessing associations with temperature, precipitation, and vegetation index. PLoS One. 2012. 7(5):e38168.
  2. Jagai JS, Griffiths JK, Kirshen PH, Webb P, Naumova EN. Seasonal patterns of gastrointestinal illness and streamflow along the Ohio River. Int. Journal of Environmental Research & Public Health. 2012. 9(5):1771-1790.
  3. Lobdell DT, Jagai JS, Rappazzo K, Messer LC.  Data sources for an Environmental Quality Index: availability, quality and utility. American Journal of Public Health. 2011. 101(S1): S277-S285.   
  4. Chui KKH, Jagai JS, Griffiths JK, Naumova EN.  Hospitalizations due to non-specific gastrointestinal diseases: A search for etiological clues. American Journal of Public Health. 2011. 101(11): 2082-2086.   
  5. Jagai JS, Griffiths JK, Kirshen PH, Webb P, Naumova EN.  Patterns of protozoan infections: spatiotemporal associations with cattle density. EcoHealth. 2010. 7(1): 33-46.   
  6. Jagai JS, Castronovo DA, Monchak J, Naumova EN. Seasonality of cryptosporidiosis: a meta-analysis approach. Environmental Research. 2009. 109(4): 465-478. 
  7. Jagai JS, Naumova EN. Clostridium difficile- associated disease in the elderly, United States. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 2009. 15(2): 343.
  8. Cohen SA, Egorov AI, Jagai JS, Matyas BT, DeMaria A, Chui KKH, Griffiths JK, Naumova EN. The SEEDs of two gastrointestinal diseases: Socioeconomic, environmental, and demographic factors related to cryptosporidiosis and giardiasis in Massachusetts. Environmental Research. 2008. 108(2): 185-191.
  9. Naumova EN, Jagai JS, Matyas B, DeMaria A, MacNeill IB, Griffiths JK. Enteric Diseases Seasonality and Ambient Temperature in Massachusetts.  Epidemiology & Infection. 2007. 135(2):281-292.
  10. Naumova EN, Yepes H, Griffiths JK, Sempertegui F, Khurana G, Jagai JS, Jativa E, Estrella B. Emergency room visits for respiratory conditions in children increased after Guagua Pichincha volcanic eruptions in April 2000 in Quito, Ecuador observational study: time series analysis. Environmental Health: A Global Access Science Source. 2007. 6:21.