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Tufts University School of Medicine

School of Medicine News

  • A new study finds that two-father families still face discrimination, especially in states and settings that offer fewer legal and social protections.

  • The new Tufts Center for Integrated Management of Antimicrobial Resistance (CIMAR) is tackling one of the biggest global health concerns. By capitalizing on the existing strengths of Tufts schools and Tufts Medical Center and tapping faculty already working in the field from across the university, CIMAR is poised to become an internationally recognized center and trailblazer in AMR management.

  • Phil Haydon on his yacht

    Phil Haydon was just fifteen years old when he suffered a severe brain injury that resulted in post-traumatic epilepsy. Today he’s the Chair of Tufts School of Medicine’s Department of Neuroscience, and in November of 2021 he plans to set sail from Boston and circumnavigate the globe on a fifty-foot yacht to raise awareness and money for epilepsy research.

  • Hospital hallway

    After hearing rhetoric that immigrants, particularly undocumented immigrants, are a burden to our health-care system, Lila Flavin, M19, decided to look at the data and find out the truth.

  • David Farber, M95, and Muhammad “Mo” Feteiha, M95

    David Farber, M95, and Muhammad "Mo" Feteiha, M95 rallied classmates to establish the Mark A. Engleman, M.D., Class of 1995 Scholarship in memory of their friend, who died in April 2016.

  • Connor O’Boyle, MG17 (MBS), M21, and Dublin, his golden retriever at the Floating Hospital for Children

    For an hour every Sunday, Connor O’Boyle, MG17 (MBS), M21, and Dublin, his three-year-old English cream golden retriever, visit patients at the Floating Hospital for Children’s Pediatric Intensive Care Unit via Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine’s Paws for People volunteer program.

  • Betty Liu, M19

    When Betty Liu, M19, left her native California to study architecture at Washington University in St. Louis, she missed her mother’s Shanghainese cooking. But she soon realized if she wanted to eat the food she grew up with, she’d have to learn to make it.

  • Illustration of a water molecule and cholera bacteria

    The tide is turning in a fifty-year war on a persistent strain of cholera, thanks to a team co-led by Tufts scientists and their research on the molecule cGAMP.

  • Three items from the Smithsonian exhibit on epidemics

    To mark the hundredth anniversary of the 1918 “Spanish flu”—which killed at least 50 million people worldwide—the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History recently opened an exhibit that explores how human pandemics emerge from animals and the environment. Serving as the chief scientific adviser of Outbreak: Epidemics in a Connected World was Jonathan Epstein, MG02 (MPH), V02, an international expert in Ebola, Nipah virus, severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), and other diseases.

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