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Tufts University School of Medicine

School of Medicine News

  • Alvar Gustafson, who died October 13 at age seventy-two, put students first. During his more than forty years at Tufts University, he taught medical, dental, and veterinary students, earning a reputation as an inspiring professor at each school. He was the founding faculty director of the medical school’s Master of Science in Biomedical Sciences (MBS), created to strengthen the credentials of students applying to medical, dental, or other health-sciences programs.

  • Sad ghost

    Why has the rate of teenage depression and anxiety doubled in a generation? A School of Medicine psychiatry professor says the answer is in our pockets.

  • Otolaryngologist Robert Ossoff, D73, M75, standing in front of 2 gold records

    For over three decades, the biggest country stars—Johnny Cash, Larry Gatlin, Wynonna Judd, and Mandy Moore—have trusted one team with their most previous instruments: otolaryngologist Robert Ossoff, D73, M75, and the Vanderbilt Voice Center.

  • Illustration of two people in a lab

    To be truly groundbreaking, a biomedical discovery needs to make a difference in the real world. That’s the premise driving translational science, a field that bridges gaps between research and clinical implementation. By fostering collaborations, Tufts CTSI is bringing scientific discoveries to the clinic and beyond.

  • Robin Cotter and Katelyn Foley celebrate after finding out they both got into their first-choice residency programs on Match Day at Tufts School of Medicine on March 15, 2019.

    On March 15th, Tufts fourth-year medical students gathered with friends, family and faculty on the 4th floor of the Medical Education Building to celebrate Match Day and learn where their residency program matches will take them—professionally and geographically—after graduation.

  • Neuroscientist Klaus Miczek is working on stopping the brain system that creates a craving for alcohol and drugs in times of stress

  • Illustration of a doctor and patient talking

    Dr. Andrea Gordon, associate professor of family medicine, explains why doctor-patient relationships, like jazz, require a healthy dose of improvisation.

  • boys filling water containers in Dhaka, Bangladesh

    Tufts researchers are developing a treatment to prevent the spread of cholera using bacteriophages—viruses that kill the cholera bacteria. Cholera is prevalent in regions with inadequate access to clean water and sanitation, striking almost 3 million people each year worldwide, and kills 95,000.

  • A new study finds that two-father families still face discrimination, especially in states and settings that offer fewer legal and social protections.

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